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Patients Against Lymphoma

 

Support  > Careers and Cancer

Last update: 08/07/2014

TOPICS
 

Taking time off | Guidelines for working during treatment |
Traveling with cancer | Fighting discrimination in the Workplace

Also see our Insurance resource page

The diagnosis of lymphoma doesn't mean that you cannot work or pursue career goals, but  it is likely to require some adjustments.  Here we list resources and tips on how to continue to work, or seek employment, or maintain insurance if you should change jobs.

"Revolutionary advances in cancer treatments are resulting in thousands-if not millions-more cancer survivors who are living longer, healthier and extremely fulfilling lives. ... And if they were working before their diagnosis, 80 percent returned to work after their treatment ended." 

Source - Hopkinsmedicine.org no longer available.

Common forms of discrimination include:

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Refusal to hire

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Suggestions that the person with cancer would "be better off" not continuing to work

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Demotion or denial of promotion

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Not allowing time off for medical appointments

Source: cancercare.org 


Working through treatment

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Ask your doctor for advice on working during treatment.

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Inform your doctor about how important it is for you to continue working if possible.

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Some patients report working during treatment for lymphoma and other cancers. 
 
Your ability to work during treatment will depend on the type of treatment and the anticipated side effects.

Reactions to the same treatment can vary so have ready alternative plans.

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Reactions may depend in part on your age and fitness.

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Ask your doctor specifically about how your diagnosis and treatment might affect your career.

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Inform your doctor about your job and the unique circumstances you address at work

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Ask your doctor how your diagnosis, supportive care and treatment is likely to affect your job.
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What are common reactions to the medications?

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What can you do to manage them?

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Know what each medicine is and how it will affect you.

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See if you can be flexible with the time you take your meds, in order to minimize any side effects at work.

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Ask about oral therapies and other options that might require less time away from work.

Here are important points about how you and the study doctor can make side effects less of a problem:

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Tell your doctor if you notice or feel anything different so they can see if you are having a side effect.

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Your doctor may be able to treat some side effects.

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Your doctor may adjust the doses of the drugs to try to reduce side effects.

In the News

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Video: City of Hope | Ask the Experts -
Cancer and the Law
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYEjqHsdDRw&feature=related 

Legal matters affect many cancer patients, survivors and their families. Learn about the most common cancer-related legal issues including: health insurance options, employment rights and reasonable accommodations in the workplace, taking time off work, and access to disability insurance and government benefits.

Featuring City of Hope experts:

Jen Flory, Esq.
Director
Cancer Legal Resource Center

 

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Taking time off and returning to work

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Keeping up appearances  ACS |
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Guidance cancerandcareer.org

"Tell your doctor exactly what your job is and any unique circumstances you'll be coping with.
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Taking Time Off  cancerandcareer.org
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Returning to work  cancerandcareer.org
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Traveling with cancer 

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Avoiding in-flight colds  ehow  
 
And it's always a good idea to review the Immunization Guide
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Free travel  PAL
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Tips on safe travel  cancerandcareer.org
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Employment : Fighting Discrimination in the Workplace

Resources to help you advocate for yourself or someone else who has cancer
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Career - NCCS - Working It Out - Your Employment Rights As A Cancer Survivor

Employment Challenges and Cancer Survivors
How to Avoid Job Discrimination
How Employment Discrimination Laws
Protect Cancer Survivors
Know Your Legal Rights
Talk It Out Before You Sue
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Guidance  cancercare.org
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KFF.org - A Consumer Guide to Handling Disputes with Your
Employer or Private Health Plan, 2003 Update 
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Your rights in the workplace 
cancercare.org
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

The ADA: Your Employment Rights as an Individual With a Disability
http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/ada18.html 
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And here's an excellent organization that deals with workplace discrimination and insurance problems:
 
Patient Advocate Foundation
700 Thimble Shoal Blvd, Suite 200
Newport News, VA 23606

Phone: 800-532-5274
Web: www.patientadvocate.org
Email:
Help@patientadvocate.org
 
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Q&A on Privacy  HIPAA
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In Job Interviews, Should I Say I'm a Cancer Survivor?  fortune.com 
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10 Things To Avoid On Your Resume - Cancer and Careers http://bit.ly/nLJOW4
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The laws that protect you
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Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or call (800) 669-4000
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Family and Medical Leave Act
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Health and Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) OF 1996 
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Regional help contact info  US Dept of Health & Human Services
When you have a question about insurance portability.
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Rehab Act of 1973
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The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
Losing insurance coverage is a major concern of patients who want to change jobs.  
This fact sheet describes your rights and the law.
 
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Patient questions and perspectives on changing jobs  PAL 
(A thread from NHL-follic support)

If you think you have been discriminated against in employment on the basis of disability, 
you can file a complaint with:

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) within 180 days of the alleged discrimination (according to some state or local laws, you can take up to 300 days). 

For more specific information about ADA requirements affecting employment, contact the EEOC at 800-669-4000 or 800-669-6820 (TDD). 

For general ADA information, answers to specific technical questions, free ADA materials, or information about filing a complaint, call 800-514-0301 or 800-514-0383 (TDD).

Source: ACS 

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Health Insurance Portability

These resources will help you to identify your rights, and contact the persons who are qualified to answer questions about insurance portability and privacy. 

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Guidance  The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
Losing insurance coverage is a major concern of patients who want to change jobs.  
This fact sheet describes your rights and the law. 
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The Affordable Care Act provides protection from employer and insurance discrimination as workers are less dependent on their employer to get affordable health insurance, and insurance providers can no longer exclude persons based on a preexisting diagnosis of cancer - or price out such persons. 
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Regional help contact info  US Dept of Health & Human Services
When you have a question about insurance portability.

 

 
Disclaimer:  The information on Lymphomation.org is not intended to be a substitute for 
professional medical advice or to replace your relationship with a physician.
For all medical concerns,  you should always consult your doctor. 
Patients Against Lymphoma, Copyright 2004,  All Rights Reserved.